Our Facebook Genders! Important Announcement!

“US Facebook users can choose from one of 50 gender options” [23]. Even better, as gender fluid we have multiple, variable gender options.

Gender Fluid– someone whose gender identity and presentation are not confined to only one gender category. Gender fluid people may have dynamic or fluctuating understandings of their gender, moving between categories as feels right.[24]

female-shower-roomThis is it! no more restrictions of boring cis-gender male!

For example, a gender fluid person might feel more like a man one day and more like a woman on another day, or that neither term is a good fit. [24]

Yes! In a college gym with a women’s group shower,  I feel more like a woman, a Male to Female/MTF or transgender female,  lesbian female, of course.

Male to Female/MTF– a trans person who was assigned male sex (likely at birth), and now lives as a woman and has a feminine gender identity. This person may or may not have altered her physical body with surgery, hormones, or other modification (e.g., voice training, electrolysis, etc.). MTF is an abbreviation of “Male To Female”. Generally uses female pronouns (e.g., “she” or “her”) or gender neutral pronouns.

We will clarify our pronouns in a later post when we will require to be called “she”, “they”, “hir”, etc.

Some genderqueer people prefer to use gender-neutral pronouns. Usage of singular ‘they’, ‘their’ and ‘them’ is the most common;[34] and ze, sie, hir, co, and ey are used as well. Some others prefer the conventional gender-specific pronouns ‘her’ or ‘him’, prefer to be referred to alternately as ‘he’ and ‘she’, or prefer to use only their name and not use pronouns at all.[35] Many genderqueer people prefer additional neutral language, such as the title ‘Mx.’ instead of Mr. or Ms.[36]   [Source: Wikipedia]


At other times, according to my mood, I might, changing between the following

Gender Questioning– Someone who may be questioning their gender or gender identity, and/or considering other ways of experiencing or expressing their gender or gender presentation.[24]

Neither– Not putting a label on one’s gender. […]

Non-binary– Similar to genderqueer, this is a way of describing one’s gender as outside the two-gender (I.e., man/woman) system and/or challenging that system.[…]

Pangender– “Pan” means every, or all, and this is another identity label such like genderqueer or neutrois that challenges binary gender and is inclusive of gender diverse people. […]

Two-spirit– This term likely originated with the Zuni tribe of North America, though two-spirit persons have been documented in numerous tribes. Native Americans, who have both masculine and feminine characteristics and presentations, have distinct roles in their tribes, and they are seen as a third gender. (Recently, Germany and Nepal adopted a third gender option for citizens to select). [Read all at: What Each of Facebook’s 51 New Gender Options Means]

And only on Sundays and hollidays, we wake up Genderfluid, are Two-spirit in the morning, are Aporagender male identified from 12 noon to 4 pm, and Bigender from 4 pm to 9 pm.

Aporagender A fairly new word stemming from the Greek ‘apor’, meaning ‘separate’. Aporagender is an umbrella term meaning “a gender separate from male, female and anything in between while still having a very strong and specific gendered feeling.” That latter part is key, then, distinguishing it from Agender.

Bigender Relatively straightforward: a bigender person sees themselves as having two gender identities. The separate genders could both be male, or female, mixed or other – and may be felt at the same time or entirely distinctly.

Facebook sex changes: which one of 50 genders are you?

Until now Facebook users have had to choose “male” or “female” as a gender when signing up for an account, but from today people will be able to select one of 50 options including “intersex” and “androgynous”.

The site also allows users to select a gender-neutral pronoun, so the site would suggest to friends that they “wish them a happy birthday” rather than “wish him a happy birthday”. […]

The list of 50 gender options in full

Agender

Androgyne

Androgynes

Androgynous

Bigender

Cis […]

Two-spirit [Facebook sex changes: which one of 50 genders are you?]

What Each of Facebook’s 51 New Gender Options Means

Gender terms are dynamic and some terms are more often used or preferred in some communities, or parts of the country. Some terms are also generational, being more common among younger or older people. Facebook’s list of gender terms cannot cover every possible identity a person can have. Similarly, our glossary to these terms – while put together with much thought and care – most certainly cannot capture all of the nuances of gender, or how people feel about their own identities.

Gender identity can be a sensitive issue and it’s best to let other people tell you about their gender (if they want to) rather than make assumptions. Facebook’s new gender options give people a chance to do just that and, we feel, are a good step toward expanding conversations about gender. Remember as you read through these gender terms that they are terms of gender – not sex, and not sexual orientation. Those are totally different topics.

For more terms and understandings of sex and gender, Eli Green and Eric Peterson’s glossary of Sex/Gender terms is a great source for more information.[…]

Bigender– someone who identifies as both a man and a woman. A Bigender identity is a combination of these two genders, but not necessarily a 50/50 combination, as these genders are often felt – and expressed – fully. Similar to individuals who identify as gender fluid, bigender people may present as men, as women, or as gender-neutral ways on different days.

Cis– all of these terms capture that a person is not trans or does not have a gender diverse identity or presentation.

Cis Female (see also Cis Woman, Cisgender Female, Cisgender Woman); a female who identifies as a woman/has a feminine gender identity.[…]

Gender Fluid– someone whose gender identity and presentation are not confined to only one gender category. Gender fluid people may have dynamic or fluctuating understandings of their gender, moving between categories as feels right. For example, a gender fluid person might feel more like a man one day and more like a woman on another day, or that neither term is a good fit.

Gender Nonconforming– Someone who looks and/or behaves in ways that don’t conform to, or are atypical of, society’s expectations of how a person of that gender should look or behave. (See also this excellent article by Dr. Eric Grollman about gender conformity & gender non-conformity).

Gender Questioning– Someone who may be questioning their gender or gender identity, and/or considering other ways of experiencing or expressing their gender or gender presentation.

Gender Variant– an umbrella term that refers to anyone who, for any reason, does not have a cisgender identity (which includes the trans* umbrella). Others acknowledge issues with this term as it implies that such genders are “deviations” from a standard gender, and reinforces the “naturalness” of the two-gender system. Some prefer the terms “gender diverse” or “gender-nonconforming.

Genderqueer– Someone who identifies outside of, or wishes to challenge, the two-gender (I.e., man/woman) system; may identify as multiple genders, a combination of genders, or “between” genders. People who use this term may feel that they are reclaiming the word “queer”, which has historically been used as a slur against gay men and women. This term is used more often by younger generations doing the “reclaiming” and less often by slightly older generations who may have personally experienced the term “queer” as a slur. […]

Neither– Not putting a label on one’s gender. […]

Non-binary– Similar to genderqueer, this is a way of describing one’s gender as outside the two-gender (I.e., man/woman) system and/or challenging that system.[…]

Pangender– “Pan” means every, or all, and this is another identity label such like genderqueer or neutrois that challenges binary gender and is inclusive of gender diverse people.

Transgender– an umbrella term […]

Two-spirit– This term likely originated with the Zuni tribe of North America, though two-spirit persons have been documented in numerous tribes. Native Americans, who have both masculine and feminine characteristics and presentations, have distinct roles in their tribes, and they are seen as a third gender. (Recently, Germany and Nepal adopted a third gender option for citizens to select). [Read all at: What Each of Facebook’s 51 New Gender Options Means]

A (nearly) complete glossary of gender identities for your next census

Glossary of terms

Agender Somebody who either feels they have no gender identity, or who identify not as male or female but ‘neutral.’

Aporagender A fairly new word stemming from the Greek ‘apor’, meaning ‘separate’. Aporagender is an umbrella term meaning “a gender separate from male, female and anything in between while still having a very strong and specific gendered feeling.” That latter part is key, then, distinguishing it from Agender.

Bigender Relatively straightforward: a bigender person sees themselves as having two gender identities. The separate genders could both be male, or female, mixed or other – and may be felt at the same time or entirely distinctly.

Butch Used as both a noun and an adjective, this refers to a person who identifies as masculine (either physically, mentally or emotionally). The term is occasionally used as a lesbian slur, but has been reclaimed by some gay women and turned into a affirmative label.

Cisgender Pronounced “siss-gender”, this refers to anybody who identifies with the same biological gender they were born with. Tentatively, then, it could be seen as the opposite of transgender.

Demigender A catchall term for all identities that only have a partial connection to a certain gender. Demiboy and demigirl are also frequently used.

Femme Used by and for anybody who identifies as feminine, but more commonly associated with feminine-identifying gay women.

Genderfluid A term describing individuals for whom gender is unfixed: they fluctuate between different identities aside from their biological assignment.

Gender neutral A synonym for ‘agender’: somebody who identifies with no gender.

Gender queer An umbrella term covering any feelings about gender alternative to society’s traditional expectations.

Intergender One of the oldest (and thus often deemed outdated) terms, this is used by anybody whose gender identity is between male and female. Some believe intergender should only refer to those born with different genitals to the norm, though this is more commonly known as ‘intersex’.

Nonbinary Fairly simply, anybody who doesn’t identify as simply female or male.

Polygender Identifying with several different genders either at the same time or different times. Normally the term is given to those with four or more.

Transgender/Trans An umbrella term for any individual whose gender identity is different from what is typically associated with their assigned biological sex at birth. It should be noted that transgenderism is a gender identity and not a sexual orientation, therefore no assumptions should be made as a result.

Share

Author: Human-Stupidy (Admin)

Honest Research, Truth, Sincerity is our maxim. We hate politally correct falsification, falsification, repression of the truth, academic dishonesty and censorship.

Leave a Reply. We appreciate a discussion: if you disagree, your comment still is welcome.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.