Tony Nicklinson is a law abiding man who has done no wrong. After a stroke, his life became “pure torture”. He is locked into his body, fully lucid, unable to move anything but his eyes and part of his face, totally dependent on others to take care of him.

Human Rights obsess with the rights of criminals. It is of great concern if a murderous felon takes 5 minutes to die, suffers for 5 minutes when put to death. But if a honest, law abiding man is forced to a few decades of torture, of life and suffering against his will,  that is nobody’s concern. No animal would ever be forced or allowed to suffer in such cruel inhumane ways.

Inducing such a “locked-in syndrome” in a murderer, for 30 years, would be a much harsher punishment then swift death penalty with 2 minute death. It would be worse then 30 years in a well kept orderly prison. Putting a high cost on society and family to support the involuntary suffering is even more cruel, as cruel as medieval inquisition’s practice to bill the cost of torture to the victim and his family.

Robert Kurzban  describes how Human Society and religion have a tendency to interfere in other people’s life. With moral indignation! Philosopher *Peter Singer devotes most of his work to analyzing such life and death situations.

Thank God, there is Dignitas in Switzerland, If Tony Nicklinson has the money, if he has friendly helpers, he can travel to faraway Switzerland to end his miserable life. Hopefully those who help him on his trip will not be punished when they return to England.

The person who wishes to die meets several Dignitas personnel, in addition to an independent doctor, for a private consultation. The independent doctor assesses the evidence provided by the patient and is met on two separate occasions, with a time gap between each of the consultations.[2] Legally admissible proof that the person wishes to die is also created, i.e. a signed affidavit, countersigned by independent witnesses. In cases where a person is physically unable to sign a document, a short video film of the person is made in which they are asked to confirm their identity, that they wish to die, and that their decision is made of their own free will, without any form of coercion. Dignitas

Human-Stupidity Analysis

Tony-Nicklinson-right-to-dieThe court is formally right: it is up to lawmakers to decide on changing the laws.

Declaring the law unconstitutional would be a way out of the legal dilemma. It is sad how courts and society force people to suffer a torturous life.

We have written a about the right to die. As a Libertarian, I wish intelligent adult people could decide their own fate.

Tony Nicklinson is a law abiding man who has done no wrong. After a stroke, his life became “pure torture”. He is locked into his body, fully lucid, unable to move anything but his eyes and part of his face, totally dependent on others to take care of him.

Human Rights obsess with the rights of criminals. It is of great concern if a murderous felon takes 5 minutes to die, suffers for 5 minutes when put to death. But if a honest, law abiding man is forced to a few decades of torture, of life and suffering against his will,  that is nobody’s concern. No animal would ever be forced or allowed to suffer in such cruel inhumane ways.

Inducing such a “locked-in syndrome” in a murderer, for 30 years, would be a much harsher punishment then swift death penalty with 2 minute death. It would be worse then 30 years in a well kept orderly prison. Putting a high cost on society and family to support the involuntary suffering is even more cruel, as cruel as medieval inquisition’s practice to bill the cost of torture to the victim and his family.

Robert Kurzban  describes how Human Society and religion have a tendency to interfere in other people’s life. With moral indignation! Philosopher *Peter Singer devotes most of his work to analyzing such life and death situations.

Thank God, there is Dignitas in Switzerland, If Tony Nicklinson has the money, if he has friendly helpers, he can travel to faraway Switzerland to end his miserable life. Hopefully those who help him on his trip will not be punished when they return to England.

The person who wishes to die meets several Dignitas personnel, in addition to an independent doctor, for a private consultation. The independent doctor assesses the evidence provided by the patient and is met on two separate occasions, with a time gap between each of the consultations.[2] Legally admissible proof that the person wishes to die is also created, i.e. a signed affidavit, countersigned by independent witnesses. In cases where a person is physically unable to sign a document, a short video film of the person is made in which they are asked to confirm their identity, that they wish to die, and that their decision is made of their own free will, without any form of coercion. Dignitas 

Human-Stupidity Analysis

Tony-Nicklinson-right-to-dieThe court is formally right: it is up to lawmakers to decide on changing the laws.

Declaring the law unconstitutional would be a way out of the legal dilemma. It is sad how courts and society force people to suffer a torturous life.

We have written a about the right to die. As a Libertarian, I wish intelligent adult people could decide their own fate.

Tony Nicklinson is a law abiding man who has done no wrong. After a stroke, his life became “pure torture”. He is locked into his body, fully lucid, unable to move anything but his eyes and part of his face, totally dependent on others to take care of him.

Human Rights obsess with the rights of criminals. It is of great concern if a murderous felon takes 5 minutes to die, suffers for 5 minutes when put to death. But if a honest, law abiding man is forced to a few decades of torture, of life and suffering against his will,  that is nobody’s concern. No animal would ever be forced or allowed to suffer in such cruel inhumane ways.

Inducing such a “locked-in syndrome” in a murderer, for 30 years, would be a much harsher punishment then swift death penalty with 2 minute death. It would be worse then 30 years in a well kept orderly prison. Putting a high cost on society and family to support the involuntary suffering is even more cruel, as cruel as medieval inquisition’s practice to bill the cost of torture to the victim and his family.

Robert Kurzban  describes how Human Society and religion have a tendency to interfere in other people’s life. With moral indignation! Philosopher *Peter Singer devotes most of his work to analyzing such life and death situations.

Thank God, there is Dignitas in Switzerland, If Tony Nicklinson has the money, if he has friendly helpers, he can travel to faraway Switzerland to end his miserable life. Hopefully those who help him on his trip will not be punished when they return to England.

The person who wishes to die meets several Dignitas personnel, in addition to an independent doctor, for a private consultation. The independent doctor assesses the evidence provided by the patient and is met on two separate occasions, with a time gap between each of the consultations.[2] Legally admissible proof that the person wishes to die is also created, i.e. a signed affidavit, countersigned by independent witnesses. In cases where a person is physically unable to sign a document, a short video film of the person is made in which they are asked to confirm their identity, that they wish to die, and that their decision is made of their own free will, without any form of coercion. Dignitas 

Human-Stupidity Analysis

Tony-Nicklinson-right-to-dieThe court is formally right: it is up to lawmakers to decide on changing the laws.

Declaring the law unconstitutional would be a way out of the legal dilemma. It is sad how courts and society force people to suffer a torturous life.

We have written a about the right to die. As a Libertarian, I wish intelligent adult people could decide their own fate.

Personally, I wish I could die whenever I see fit to die. With just minor precautions, a cool-off period, psychological counseling etc.

I think it is extremely inhumane to resuscitate people who, when healthy, tried to commit suicide. Resuscitating such people who did not want to live while healthy and now have to live with serious permanent injuries inflicted by jumping out of the 8th floor or by setting oneself ablaze is very cruel.

Locked-in syndrome man awaits court

LOCKED-IN syndrome sufferer Tony Nicklinson learns today whether he has won his High Court battle for the right to end his life when he chooses.

The court was told that his existence of “pure torture” could continue, if he cannot end it, for another 20 years or more.

Mr. Nicklinson, aged 58, from Melksham in Wiltshire, was left paralysed by a catastrophic stroke while on a business trip to Athens in 2005. 2

Personally, I wish I could die whenever I see fit to die. With just minor precautions, a cool-off period, psychological counseling etc.

I think it is extremely inhumane to resuscitate people who, when healthy, tried to commit suicide. Resuscitating such people who did not want to live while healthy and now have to live with serious permanent injuries inflicted by jumping out of the 8th floor or by setting oneself ablaze is very cruel.

Locked-in syndrome man awaits court

LOCKED-IN syndrome sufferer Tony Nicklinson learns today whether he has won his High Court battle for the right to end his life when he chooses.

The court was told that his existence of “pure torture” could continue, if he cannot end it, for another 20 years or more.

Mr. Nicklinson, aged 58, from Melksham in Wiltshire, was left paralysed by a catastrophic stroke while on a business trip to Athens in 2005. 2

Personally, I wish I could die whenever I see fit to die. With just minor precautions, a cool-off period, psychological counseling etc.

I think it is extremely inhumane to resuscitate people who, when healthy, tried to commit suicide. Resuscitating such people who did not want to live while healthy and now have to live with serious permanent injuries inflicted by jumping out of the 8th floor or by setting oneself ablaze is very cruel.

Locked-in syndrome man awaits court

LOCKED-IN syndrome sufferer Tony Nicklinson learns today whether he has won his High Court battle for the right to end his life when he chooses.

The court was told that his existence of “pure torture” could continue, if he cannot end it, for another 20 years or more.

Mr. Nicklinson, aged 58, from Melksham in Wiltshire, was left paralysed by a catastrophic stroke while on a business trip to Athens in 2005. 2

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5 Comments

  1. Leah says:

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    This breaks my heart. Everybody always says things like, “If I were a vegetable and had to live off a feeding tube, I’d just want to die.” Yet when such a thing happens, they aren’t allowed to die … I can’t imagine living the rest of my life in a useless body. It really is psychological torture. It’s a sad day when the government tells you what you can and can not do with your own body.

    That being said, I guess I’m one of the weird ones who is against the death penalty but for assisted suicide. The difference to me is that one is – for all intents and purposes – murder, while the other is suicide, which is not only legal but an extremely personal choice and, arguably, a right.

    My heart goes out to Mr. Nicklinson. I hope he finds his peace somehow.

  2. jewamongyou says:

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    This is heartbreaking but not surprising coming from the U.K.

  3. jewamongyou says:

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    I’m curious what your position is on abortion Leah.

  4. jack says:

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    This is another reason to retire in a country of ill-repute: to have legal or illegal access to veterinay barbiturates. To the ageing male, the West is a death and torture camp.

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